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Archive for the ‘About Drawings and Art from New York Arts and the Berkshire Revew’ Category

Thumbnail : Pre-Raphaelite Drawings at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, by Andrew Miller

Pre-Raphaelite Drawings at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, by Andrew Miller

Pollinated with the spirit of the Renaissance, spring-like, fresh and full of individual passion and wonder, the Pre Raphaelites went back to a state of painting when the Renaissance was in its stride if not its prime. Rather than seeing painting as a continuous development up to their own day, they when back to an approach and a world view at a point when art knew where it was going, striving toward a most sublime peak, a peak attained perhaps twice in western human history. The Pre Raphaelites took as their teachers and masters those of Titian’s, Michelangelo’s and Raphael’s and via intelligent imitation that went beyond mere copying they progressed, very roughly speaking, through the styles of the Italian Renaissance, and at times managed to break free of their teachers’ styles. They even wrote poems too. One can see something of this progression in the quite broad and thorough collection of their drawings and watercolors currently on display in the Art Gallery of New South Wales, most of which come from the Tate and the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery.

Thumbnail : Figure, Memorie, Spazio: disegni da Fra’Angelico a Leonardo (Sala delle Reali Poste, Galleria degli Uffizi) and La Grafica del Quattrocento: appunti di teoria, conoscenza e gusto (Gabinetto Disegni e Stampe degli Uffizi), Florence. Closed June 12th, by Daniel B. Gallagher

Figure, Memorie, Spazio: disegni da Fra’Angelico a Leonardo (Sala delle Reali Poste, Galleria degli Uffizi) and La Grafica del Quattrocento: appunti di teoria, conoscenza e gusto (Gabinetto Disegni e Stampe degli Uffizi), Florence. Closed June 12th, by Daniel B. Gallagher

The first step towards understanding Renaissance drawing is to take stock of the plethora of reasons for its existence, ranging from doodles to elaborate studies in human anatomy. What started as a design for sculpture may well have evolved into a preparatory sketch for painting. Drawing was the artist’s way of jotting down an idea before losing it and before knowing precisely what, if anything, it might develop into later.

Thumbnail : Old Master Week, New York, January 2009, Part II

Old Master Week, New York, January 2009, Part II

Sotheby’s New York Jan. 28, Old Master Drawings [N08515] Jan. 29 – 30, Important Old Master Paintings, Including European Works of Art [N08516] Jan. 31, Old Master and 19th Century European Art [N08517] Christie’s New York Jan. 27, The Scholar’s Eye: Property from the Julius Held Collection Part I [2237] Jan. 28, Important Old Master Paintings and Sculpture [2135] Jan, […]

Thumbnail : The Burt Britton Collection at Bloomsbury Auctions, New York, 9/24/09, by Michael Miller

The Burt Britton Collection at Bloomsbury Auctions, New York, 9/24/09, by Michael Miller

Only in New York could a man like Burt Britton pursue successive careers as bartender and bookseller, both equally supportive for his passion for the arts, especially the arts of the word. His enthusiasm came to fruition very late one night at the Village Vanguard, when Britton served drink after drink to a solitary last guest, Norman Mailer, trying to get him to leave, so he could go home to bed. Mailer repeated over and over again, “What do you want from me, kid?”

Thumbnail : Collection Robert Lebel: Old Master and 19th-century Drawings, Sotheby’s Paris, Auction, March 25, 2009, by Michael Miller

Collection Robert Lebel: Old Master and 19th-century Drawings, Sotheby’s Paris, Auction, March 25, 2009, by Michael Miller

Whenever a work of art changes hands there is always a story behind it. When a collection appears on the market an entire lifetime emerges, or, in the case of figures like Robert Lebel (1901-1986), a chapter in history. In the catalogue to the sale of his old master drawings, Sotheby’s manages to condense Lebel’s extraordinary range of interests and experience into a single paragraph. To say that he “defied classification” is not an exaggeration. An art historian and collector, he wrote essays, novels, as well as the first biography of Marcel Duchamp. He was a friend of André Breton, Max Ernst, and Jacques Lacan. During the Second World War the circle went into exile in New York, where Matta, Tanguy, and Claude Lévi-Strauss joined them. At this time Lebel acquired as special interest in American Indian art, especially Eskimo art. His pioneering collection of Eskimo masks was sold at the Hôtel Drouot in 2006. Now Sotheby’s has dispersed his important collection of old master and 19th-century drawings.

Thumbnail : Old Master Week I: Master Drawings New York 2009

Old Master Week I: Master Drawings New York 2009

As the world economy began to unravel in September and October, the art market continued to prosper for a week or two before entering a volatile phase which has generally been hard on the major auction houses and dealers. However, the most important and desirable objects continued to sell at prices one would have expected […]

Thumbnail : Drawn to Drama: Italian Works on Paper, 1500-1800 at the Clark, by Michael Miller

Drawn to Drama: Italian Works on Paper, 1500-1800 at the Clark, by Michael Miller

As the supply of old master drawings on the market dwindles, so do exhibitions of them, but if the exhibitions are fewer, their quality remains almost as strong as ever. The Uffizi continued its distinguished tradition at the Morgan Library this past winter, and now the Clark offers a fascinating and very beautiful layered exhibition consisting of sheets from different periods in the formation of its own collection interleaved with one of the most original and appealing of present-day private collections, the Italian drawings of Robert Loper, whose gifts include, in addition to expertise in the nooks and byways of Italian art of the sixteenth through the eighteenth century, fine taste, and a keen sense of fun.

Thumbnail : Two Remarkable Men: Konrad Oberhuber and Nicholas Hlobeczy, by Michael Miller

Two Remarkable Men: Konrad Oberhuber and Nicholas Hlobeczy, by Michael Miller

Last month two remarkable men died, Konrad Oberhuber on September 12 and Nicholas Hlobeczy on the 14th. Since they both exercised a similar beneficent influence on the world through art—and on me personally, I think it fitting to honor them together. They were on the surface quite different. One was a prominent curator and art historian, a specialist in the Italian Renaissance and in the art of drawing; the other was a photographer and poet, vividly familiar and loved by those who knew him and his work.

Thumbnail : Claude Lorrain Landscape Drawings from the British Museum at the Clark, by Michael Miller

Claude Lorrain Landscape Drawings from the British Museum at the Clark, by Michael Miller

Here in the Berkshires an exhibition of Claude Lorrain, “the Raphael of Landscape-painting,” as Horace Walpole called him, brings his work into especially sympathetic surroundings. The view from Pine Cobble, the steeper faces of Mt. Greylock, or its splendid waterfall remind us readily enough of the grander sights sketched by Claude and his fellow artists on their forays into the Roman Campagna. This natural beauty even nurtures a predilection for landscape, so that local galleries can subsist on landscapes, purveying local views for local walls. Even the Clark is susceptible, if you look over the exhibition schedule of the past few years, in which landscapes or seascapes by Klimt, Calame, Courbet, and Turner have been prominent. Far from cloying, or betraying undue self-absorption, Claude Lorraine: €”The Painter as Draftsman Drawings from the British Museum enhances this harmless local obsession with a comprehensive and coherent view of an artist whose cultural importance is undeniable, however one might discuss his stature as an artist. Claude’s influence has extended beyond art— among certain classes of British society, at least—into the shaping of whole environments and human life within them

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Isidoro Bianchi: Painter, Stuccatore, and Architect